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Exhibitions & Events:

Hand & I Banner

NYSCA Credit
Sara and Joseph Bedrick Credit

Event Banner 5-19 June 23rd Event Banner June 30th Event Banner

NYSCA Credit
Sara and Joseph Bedrick Credit
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May 5-July 14, 2019
Hand & I

Curated by Yulia Tikhonova
Opening Reception: Sunday, May 5, 2019, 2-5 pm

Hand & I Brochure Cover Image

Click image to view Brochure PDF

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May 19, 2019, 3:00-4:30 PM
What is Craftivism?
A Panel Discussion moderated by Yulia Tikhonova with presentations by scholar
Otto von Busch and artists Erika Diamond, Cat Mazza, and Miriam Schaer

RSVP 718-937-6317 or rsvp@dorsky.org

Miraim Schaer Image Cat Mazza Image Erika Diamond Image
Left to right: Babies (Not) on Board 3, Your Child is the best art you have ever made. You don't need to make any other art, 2012, 2019 by Miriam Schaer; Film to Fiber (film still), 2019 by Cat Mazza;
Fifty States
, 2016 by Erika Diamond

This panel will examine the ways in which craft—embroidery in particular—claims its rightful place
within the practice of socially engaged art.

New York-based curator and theoretician Otto von Busch has been paving the way for such “craftivists.”
Von Busch will talk about creative resistance and DIY practice, where artists develop new capabilities of craftsmanship for social engagement.

The artists will share how they use needle and thread as an impetus for positive change and how they transform craft into a collective experience of empowerment and liberation.

Otto von Busch is Associate Professor of Integrated Design at Parsons School of Design. He holds
a PhD in design from the School of Design and Craft at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. He
was previously Professor of Textiles at Konstfack, Stockholm. Von Busch has a background in arts,
craft, design, and theory, and his research explores the emergence of a new “hacktivist” designer role in fashion and craft.

Erika Diamond is a textile-focused conceptual artist. She received a BFA in Sculpture from Rhode Island School of Design and an MFA in Fiber from Virginia Commonwealth University. She has exhibited nationally and internationally and her costumes have been commissioned by Charlotte Ballet. Residencies include McColl Center for Visual Art (NC); STARworks Center for Creative Enterprise (NC); Black Iris Gallery (VA); ABK Weaving Center (WI); and Platte Forum (CO).

Cat Mazza is a visual artist whose combination of craft and digital media explores the overlap between textiles, technology and labor. Mazza has received fellowships from Creative Capital, the Rockefeller Foundation and MacDowell Colony. Her animation Knit for Defense is in the Smithsonian American Art Museum collection. Mazza is Associate Professor of Art at University of Massachusetts Boston (2007-present). She was an early staff member of the New York City art and technology center Eyebeam from 1999-2002, and has a MFA from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (2005) and a BFA from Carnegie Mellon University (1999).

Miriam Schaer is a Brooklyn-based interdisciplinary artist who uses books, garments, photography, installation and collage to explore feminist, social and spiritual issues. Her series, Baby (Not) On Board:
The Last Prejudice?
, about societal prejudice against women without children, was included in MAMA-Motherhood Around the Globe at the International Museum of Women, and featured on Babble.com and
the Huffington Post. She is represented in numerous collections, including the Alan Chasanoff Book Arts Collection at the Yale Museum, the Mata & Arthur Jaffe Collection at Florida Atlantic University, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, Harvard University, and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History & Culture at Duke University.

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June 23, 2019, 3:00-4:30 PM
Craft and Community
A Performance by Aricoco and a Panel Discussion moderated by Yulia Tikhonova with presentations by artists Blanka Amezkua, Aricoco, and Katrina Majkut

RSVP 718-937-6317 or rsvp@dorsky.org

Amezkua Image Majkut Image
Re-Konstrukt: Women and Tools (Machete), 2017 by Blanka Amezkua; Fertility Hormones, 2013
by Katrina Majkut

Following a performance by Aricoco, the discussion will turn to how artists who embroider are intertwined (pun intended) and always willing to create a critical dialogue about their passions, and to support each other by sharing the results of their research and experimentation with this medium. The word “craft” implies a high level of skill, knowledge, and experience acquired over a period of time. Creating well-crafted works of art, much like a community, requires dedication, patience, and an understanding of what is needed to advance.

In her recent performances, Aricoco has been exploring a notion of community building by examining the non-hierarchical systems of insect populations. Aricoco attempts to challenge her own vulnerability as a human, by creating parallels with the life of an insect. She sews elaborate costumes to disguise herself as an insect queen, performing ritualistic play exposing the careful relationship between the powerless insect queen (a symbol of decentralized power) and her workers (a key to their altruistic society).

Blanka Amezkua was formally trained as a painter, studying in Florence, Italy and received her B.A. from California State University Fresno. Recipient of the BRIO award from the Bronx Council on the Arts in 2007, Amezkua began an artist-run project in her bedroom called the Bronx Blue Bedroom Project (BBBP) in 2008. In 2010, BBBP’s two-year trajectory was included in several shows in New York City. The first was Greater New York: 5 Year Review at MoMA-PS 1 and Alternative Histories at Exit Art.

Aricoco was born and raised in Tokyo. Traveling back and forth between Tokyo and the United States, Tabei attended the Post-Baccalaureate Program in Studio Art at Brandeis University in 2001 and received her MFA from University of Connecticut in sculpture and video performance art in May 2007. She was awarded the A.I.R. Gallery Fellowship for 2008/09. She has participated in several residency programs including LMCC Swing Space, Vermont Studio Center, and Smack Mellon Studio Program. https://www.aricoco.com/

Katrina Majkut is a visual artist and writer living and working in Brooklyn. She is dedicated to exploring and understanding how social traditions impact civil rights. Her research and findings are represented in her writing, and through media such as embroidery and painting. Majkut published her first non-fiction book, The Adventures and Discoveries of a Feminist Bride: What No One Tells You Before You Say ‘I Do’, with Black Rose Writing in March 2018. The book examines Western wedding traditions through feminism, humor and self-deprecating anecdotes.

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June 30, 2019, 3:00-4:30 PM
The Future is Handmade
A Panel Discussion moderated by Yulia Tikhonova with presentations by
Samantha De Tillo, Noelle Mason, and Todd Oppenheimer

RSVP 718-937-6317 or rsvp@dorsky.org

Mason Image
Coyotaje (Rio Bravo) 2016 by Noelle Mason

Following the screening of the documentary, The Future Is Handmade (2019), Samantha De Tillio, Todd Oppenheimer and Noelle Mason will discuss what the future holds for craft-based art and artisanship in a world dominated by mass-produced goods and increasingly robotic manufacturing. Todd Oppenheimer’s contribution to the conversation will be based on knowledge gleaned from the multiple compelling stories published in the magazine he founded, Craftsmanship Quarterly. Samantha De Tillio will bring her experience in working with artists/craftspeople and audiences in the museum and gallery worlds to forecast what the future might hold for craft art and artists. Noelle Mason, an artist in the exhibition, will bring her perspective as a maker and speak about her choice to use embroidery as her medium of expression. This panel proposes that the handmade has an enduring significance that reflects expertise, passion, pride, and precision. These panelists will be sharing their thoughts, perspectives and experiences about the relevance of craft-making, technical skills, artisanship and traditions in a contemporary fine art context.

Noelle Mason appropriates the visual mediation left over after afflictive events such as the Rodney King beating or undocumented U.S./Mexico border crossings in order to draw awareness to systems of violence and power. Mason was awarded both the 2017 Southern Prize Fellowship in Atlanta and the 2016 First Place Florida Prize in Contemporary Art. She has also been the recipient of a Joan Mitchell Foundation Grant, a Jerome Fellowship, and the Illinois Arts Council International Artist Grant. Noelle Mason is an Associate Professor of Foundations Studio: Concepts & Practices & Trans-Media at the USF School of Art & Art History.

Todd Oppenheimer is the editor & publisher of Craftsmanship Quarterly, and the Executive Director of its non-profit umbrella organization, The Craftsmanship Initiative.

Samantha De Tillio is a curator, art historian, and writer of modern and contemporary craft. Her research focuses on illuminating feminist histories, and critically expanding the art historical canon to elevate diverse voices through exhibitions, programs, and acquisitions. De Tillio is currently Assistant Curator at the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD), where she curates exhibitions, researches the collection, and manages the acquisitions program. She is co-curator of the exhibitions MAD Collects: The Future of Craft Part 1 and The Burke Prize 2018: The Future of Craft Part 2, in 2018.

The Future is Handmade can be viewed here: https://craftsmanship.net/video/the-future-is-handmade/

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