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Winter Exhibitions & Events:

Aesthetics of Slowness Banner

NYCDCA Credit

Out of the Studio Banner The Instability of Perception Banner The Body Banner
NYCDCA & NYSCA Credits
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January 18 – March 29, 2015
An Aesthetics of Slowness
Featuring the work of Ashley Billingsley, Sandy de Lissovoy, Chris Freeman, Margaret Honda, Paul Qaysi, Frédéric Sanchez, Jeannie Simms, and Brian Wills

Curated by Chương-Đài Võ
Opening Reception: Sunday, January 18, 2:00-5:00 pm

Aesthetics of Slowness Brochure Cover
Click to download brochure PDF

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January 25, 2015, 2:00-3:30 pm
Out of the Studio: In Vietnam, China and Japan

Artist Frédéric Sanchez Interviewed by Painter and Art Critic Joe Fyfe

Seating will be limited.
RSVP 718.937.6317 or rsvp@dorsky.org

Frédéric Sanchez  exhibition view of Red
Frédéric Sanchez, exhibition view of Red, a monochrome show at Bazaar Compatible Program, Shanghai, 2014

In conversation with writer, curator and artist Joe Fyfe, Frédéric Sanchez will talk about how working abroad became a way for him to process his experiences and to define his position as a person always in between cultures. In 2006, Sanchez first went to Vietnam to learn about his Vietnamese father’s cultural heritage. During annual trips to Asia, he found inspiration from the street life, temples and museums of history, archaeology and ethnology to make abstract paintings, sculptures, collaborations with artisans, and hybrid works comprising found objects. The context of Asia changed his perception of and approach to art. He will talk about Red, a monochrome exhibition he recently made in Saigon, Shanghai and the forthcoming Fujiyoshida, involving Olivier Mosset, Vuong Tu Lam and Henry Codax.

Frédéric Sanchez is an artist based in Dijon, France. Influenced by Ellsworth Kelly, the 1980s Radical Painting group, and Neo-Geo, he views the world as a source of found abstractions and materials. His first solo show took place at Suffusive Art Gallery in Hanoi (2007). His paintings have been included in Portrait de l’artiste en motocycliste and The artist as a collector, both curated by Olivier Mosset at Le Magasin, CNAC of Grenoble (2009); Museum of Fine Arts of La Chaux-de-Fonds (2010); and Museum of Contemporary Arts of Tucson (MOCA) in Arizona (2010/2011). He took part in an exhibition about globalization and tourism titled Cosmotopia at Le Commun, BAC of Geneva (2012), in which he showed work made in response to his time spent in Vietnam. He has completed artist residencies in Hanoi, Saigon, Vienna, Rotterdam and Boston.

Joe Fyfe is a painter and art critic, based in New York City. He has exhibited extensively throughout the US and internationally. Recent solo exhibitions include White Columns, New York; Galerie Christian Lethert, Cologne; ACME, Los Angeles; James Graham & Sons, New York; Ryllega, Hanoi, Vietnam; and Bernard Ceysson, Luxembourg. Fyfe has lived and worked in Vietnam and Cambodia. His writings have been published in Artforum, Art in America, and Artcritical.com among others. Fyfe is the recipients of many prestigious awards and residencies including a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant, Guggenheim Fellowship, Fulbright Award (Research in Vietnam & Cambodia), Yaddo Fellowship and McDowell Fellowship.

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February 15, 2015, 2:00-3:30 pm
The Instability of Perception

A Panel Discussion Moderated by Exhibition Curator Chương-Đài Võ with Artists Ashley Billingsley and Paul Qaysi and Scholar Gabrielle Starr

Seating will be limited.
RSVP 718.937.6317 or rsvp@dorsky.org

Ashley Billingsley & Paul Qaysi Images
Ashley Billingsley, Fire in Woods IV, 2013; Paul Qays,i Gaza July 16, 2014 [0192116 AUG 14 MISPRINT], 2014

The exhibition An Aesthetics of Slowness embraces the limits of perception in apprehending physical experience. In their opacity and seeming transparency, the projects do not offer easily discernable representations, but instead focus our perception on the process of looking and seeing. This panel brings together two of the artists in the exhibition and a researcher of aesthetics and neuroscience to speak about their approaches to the question of perception. Ashley Billingsley will talk about her representations of landscape as a vehicle for exploring the inadequacy of the senses in deciphering direct experience. Paul Qaysi will discuss his examination of the invisible structures of perception and framing that shape notions of truth and reality about war, death and civilian casualties. Gabrielle Starr will discuss her research on how the brain responds to aesthetic stimulation.

Ashley Billingsley is an artist based in Boston, MA. Her work examines the tenuous relationship between visual apprehension and meaning. Recent projects include Boom and Bust, a drawing installation commissioned by New York’s apexart for On the Streets, a 2014 exhibition at JavaArts in Phnom Penh, Cambodia; and Save Yourself, a series of drawings inspired by a moment in Akira Kurosawa’s 1954 film, Seven Samurai. She studied at School of the Art Institute of Chicago before earning a BFA from University of Minnesota-Minneapolis and an MFA from School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and Tufts University combined degree program. Select exhibitions include Right Here Over There at Lexington Art League in Kentucky; Close Encounters at Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts/Gallery 51 in North Adams, MA; and Beyond Purview at New Art Center in Newton, MA.

Paul Qaysi received his BFA in Sculpture from Pratt Institute in 1989, and MFA in Photography from Bard College-International Center of Photography in 2009. His photography, sculpture and animation examine the effects and representations of war that include documentation of civilian causalities and forgotten accidents of the Iraq War and other conflicts. Qaysi also produces self-portraits and photographed installations that document the conjunction of time and place. Many of these works treat themes of survival and alienation.

Gabrielle Starr is a scholar of eighteenth-century British literature and of aesthetics, as well as a researcher in experimental aesthetics. She uses the tools of cognitive neuroscience, behavioral psychology, and the humanities to explore the contours of aesthetic experience. Her most recent book is Feeling Beauty (MIT Press, 2013); it explores the ways our responses to painting, poetry and music are mediated by brain-based reward processes and by the default mode network. This work has been supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in the form of a New Directions Fellowship to facilitate training in neuroscience, as well as by an NSF-ADVANCE grant (jointly with Nava Rubin) at New York University. She is currently director of a three-year, collaborative international project on brain responses to music, painting, and literary imagery.

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March 8, 2015, 2:00-3:30 pm
The Body: Disruptions of the Intimate

A Conversation Between Artists Chris Freeman and Jeannie Simms

Seating will be limited.
RSVP 718.937.6317 or rsvp@dorsky.org

Jeannie Simms & Chris Freeman Images
Jeannie Simms, Interiors, 2008; Chris Freeman, Flock, 2012

Chris Freeman and Jeannie Simms’ projects explore the body as a site of memories and desires. For his latest paintings of landscapes, Freeman relies on his hands and domestic objects—queen-size bed sheets, house paint and small brushes—to convey his inner world. He will discuss how an awareness of the body and mortality affect his choice of art material and representations of wood scenes as metaphors for the obstacles that we construct in our lives. Simms will talk about how art can serve as a medium for representing women’s lives and their work. She will discuss her collaborations with Indonesian lesbian domestic workers to create portraits and performances that speak of their personal lives and vulnerable economic situations. Simms also will speak about 19th century women artists and their roles in the suffragist and abolitionist movements, and the women’s importance for understanding the relationship between art, gender and social justice.

Chris Freeman lives and works in Hudson, New York. He currently has a solo show at TOPAZ ARTS titled New Paintings. His work was exhibited at the Fountain Art Fair at The 69th Regimen Armory 2013 by TOPAZ ARTS, and in group shows at the Henry Hudson Gallery and David Bruner Gallery in Hudson, New York, in 2012. In the late 1980s, Freeman fabricated major sculpture projects with Claes Oldenburg, Vito Acconci, Robert Longo, Nam June Paik, Robert Morris, James Casebere, and Eric Staller. He worked exclusively with Richard Artschwager as foreman and installer through the 1990s. Freeman formed “Slow Moving Vehicle”, a practical-art-movement in New York City to create housing for homeless people. He had his first solo exhibition of paintings and photographs in 1990 at Private/Public; among many projects and performances in New York City, he created experiential art installations at venues including HERE, The Knitting Factory, Limelight, ABC No Rio, The Gas Station and Michael Klein Gallery. He recently restored the fifth oldest synagogue in the U.S. as his home and painting studio in Hudson. He also built his first drag racing pick-up truck and won the prestigious Top Honors at the 2012 Syracuse Nationals Hot Rod Show and 2013 Adirondack Nationals.

Jeannie Simms’ works are rooted in photography and the moving image. She scours history and contemporary situations, contesting accepted perspectives and proposing new narratives. She recently completed a seven-month residency at Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Massachusetts, and a commission with Nara International Film Festival in Japan. Current and future shows include Currier Museum, Provincetown Art Association & Museum, Society for Cinema and Media Studies, The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), San Francisco Camerawork, International Film Festival Rotterdam, Courtisane Video and New Media Festival in Belgium, ICA in London, ARS Electronica Center in List Austria, Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Alternative Film Center in Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro, and Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions. She has been funded by Art Matters Grant. She attended Eugene Lang College at The New School for Social Research, and has an MFA from University of California, Irvine.

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